Klir: Book Review of “More than life itself: A synthetic continuation in relational biology”

Recently published review [1] by the editor-in-chief of IJGS George Klir of Louie’s book “More than Life Itself” [2]. The essential quote from the review (with which I heartily agree):

My overall impression of the book is very positive. It is not only a comprehensive, rigorous and well-written overview of Rosen’s life-long contributions to theoretical biology, but it also contains some additional contributions by Louie himself to this area. I consider the book very relevant to all readers of this journal, not only those interested in biology. The book presents the material at two levels, a level of conceptual/philosophical discussion and a level of rigorous mathematical treatment. Understanding the latter requires substantial mathematical maturity. I suspect that the most challenging aspect of the book for many readers will be the heavy use of category theory, which plays an important role in Rosen’s system theory. Although requisite mathematical preliminaries are concisely presented in the book, more extensive knowledge, especially in category theory, is likely to be needed for full understanding of the material covered.

 

References

[1] Klir, G. 2010. Book Review of “More than life itself: A synthetic continuation in relational biology”. IJGS 39(7):783 – 797. DOI:10.1080/03081079.2010.504338.

[2] Louie, A. 2009. More Than Life itself: A Synthetic Continuation in Relational Biology. Ontos-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-86838-044-6.

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One Response to Klir: Book Review of “More than life itself: A synthetic continuation in relational biology”

  1. Alan Levin says:

    I also highly recommend More Than Life Itself to those who have been studying Rosen. This work truly illuminates and extends Life Itself in several ways. First, there is significantly more depth of mathematical and philosophical underpinning that is provided. Some of this is implicit in Rosen’s work, but here every step is made clear. Also, Louie in several areas goes beyond Rosen’s development, so that this is more than illumination. Second, this book improves and clarifies the notation of relational modeling and sets it in a more disciplined graph theoretic framework. And finally, hearing Rosen’s arguments interpreted and expressed in the words of another who understands them well is most helpful.